Author Archives: Kelsey Hollinger

Blog #10. Math Class

 I always struggled with math in school and I still do. Math class made me feel anxious because most of the students in my class understood what the teacher was explaining, and I was completely lost most of the time and always asked “too many” questions. Math was always taught in the same way forContinue reading “Blog #10. Math Class” Continue reading

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Blog 9: Stories

Thinking back to the types of literacy presented in my school I find it hard to remember anything of significance. In my opinion that is proof that what we read did not talk about diversity, challenge the norm, or make me ask questions. There seemed to be a one-track mindset in my school and community.Continue reading “Blog 9: Stories” Continue reading

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Blog #8. Citizenship

            Throughout my K-12 schooling we did a lot of things around the community, such as picking garbage, planting flowers, and painting murals. My teachers always said that being a good citizen meant to be respectful and helpful community members. From the article the most prevalent approach to citizenship seen in my grade school wouldContinue reading “Blog #8. Citizenship” Continue reading

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Blog #7. We are all Treaty People

In response to the students email I would recommend being vulnerable with the students by showing them the seriousness of understanding treaties as Canadian citizens. Treat the subject as if it is brand new, the same way you would introduce a new concept in math or English. Treaties are important for everyone to understand becauseContinue reading “Blog #7. We are all Treaty People” Continue reading

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Blog#6. Treaties, Curriculum, and Public Policy

After reading the Levin article it is clear to me that the development of the curriculum is much more complex than one would think. Curriculum is developed through many debates with numerous parties such as, governments, teacher, parents, ect… These groups debate on things like, what should be taught, how it should be taught, whenContinue reading “Blog#6. Treaties, Curriculum, and Public Policy” Continue reading

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Blog #5. Reinhabitaion and Decolonization

Throughout the narrative I see evidence of reinhabitation and decolonization in a number of ways. First, I notice that there is a social connection happening between the Mushkegowuk Elders and young people. This is an important part of decolonization especially for youth that are not First Nations because it allows children to be introduced toContinue reading “Blog #5. Reinhabitaion and Decolonization” Continue reading

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Blog #4. The “Good” Student

According common sense, to be a “good” student one must simply do as they are told by the teacher, sit quietly for long periods of time, not show self-expression, and most importantly learn what the teacher has told them to learn. Kumashiro describes a student that had trouble performing the tasks that a “good” studentContinue reading “Blog #4. The “Good” Student” Continue reading

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#3. Feminist Inquiry and the Curriculum

For my critical summary assignment, I have decided to talk about feminist inquiry and the curriculum. Feminist inquiry does not only focus in on women, it also focuses on privilege, intersectionality, power dynamics, culture, and gender equality. With the aspect of curriculum added to the idea of feminist inquiry one would be investigating the privilege,Continue reading “#3. Feminist Inquiry and the Curriculum” Continue reading

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#2 The Tyler Rationale

The Tyler rational is a basic form on educational curriculum design that is seen in the government of Saskatchewan curriculum. Consisting of specific objectives, teacher chosen activities, and teacher chosen experiences. Most of my elementary, high school, and some of my university school has been designed around this curriculum idea. My early school experiences lookedContinue reading “#2 The Tyler Rationale” Continue reading

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#1. The Problem with Common Sense

After reading “the problem with common sense”, I have a new perspective on what common sense might actually mean. The author, Kumashiro, defines common sense as something that everyone should know, (Kumashiro, 2009, p. XXIX). Their definition of common sense is very similar to my own, and most likely everyone else’s. The problem with everyoneContinue reading “#1. The Problem with Common Sense” Continue reading

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