March 15th

 

  1. At the beginning of the reading, Leroy Little Bear (2000) states that colonialism “tries to maintain a singular social order by means of force and law, suppressing the diversity of human worldviews. … Typically, this proposition creates oppression and discrimination” (p. 77). Think back on your experiences of the teaching and learning of mathematics — were there aspects of it that were oppressive and/or discriminating for you or other students?

 

Looking back at my days of taking math in school, there was only one answer and little diversity in terms of methods for getting those answers. On paper, one could create a list comparing mathematics to colonization, although one is far more significant than the other. I would not say that any of my math experience would resemble aspects of oppression, nor discrimination. Perhaps only minor instances of the teacher telling me I was wrong, or the method I used to get the answer was wrong. This could have suppressed creativity and diversity although I think this is the nature of mathematics as a process. The very nature of math is that there is only one answer, and there are specific ways to get said answer. With colonization, there are far more variables at play.

2. After reading Poirier’s article: Teaching mathematics and the Inuit Community, identify at least three ways in which Inuit mathematics challenge Eurocentric ideas about the purposes of mathematics and the way we learn it.

This Inuit community recognize that like many things math is a social construct, and the topics that are taught are deemed important by authority figures. This Inuit community is looking to use this to teach what their community deems important; this varies from the European priories in math. For example, Inuit students begin their education counting using their native language, rather than French and English. Inuit students are introduced to counting in other languages later in their elementary career. Lastly, Inuit children are taught in the context of their culture, challenging the classic European math implemented in curriculums across the country. For example, some of the math questions include context surrounding their culture. “Imagine that you are an Inuit hunter, in the snow- and ice-covered tundra, at minus 60 degrees. How will you orient yourself? Days afford a few hours of light only, and getting lost far away from your camp or village is” (detrimental)

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March 8th

 

Throughout my schooling years, I underwent years of citizenship education. Beginning with grade six, as far back as I can remember, we were taught about democracy and how every person has the right to vote. This is interesting as I look back because as a child we were getting told that democracy was the best way, without calling it democracy, just that every person has the right to vote (even though we could not vote on topics in class). Later in school, my teacher even went so far as to set up voting booths and have us run through a simplified process of how elections were taken.

Secondly, part of the hidden curriculum as we refer to it, we were always taught to keep our things picked up (by both teachers and parents). We also learned to hold the door open for the person behind us or to help them load things into the school first days of class. These teachings translated, at least personally to a person who picks up litter on the streets, always holds the door open for the person behind me, and helping people who are carrying/loading too much on their own. I do not think that I am the only one who does these acts, this is especially relevant in small towns and communities.

The largest example of citizenship that was taught to me in my schooling was to always help others, no matter who they are. We were always taught the golden rule, “treat others how you would want to be treated”. This was a large influence on me to participate in food drives, and becoming an organ donor. I now always think, if my role was reversed what would I want, or need.

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March 1st

 

  1. What is the purpose of teaching Treaty Ed (specifically) or First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) Content and Perspectives (generally) where there are few or no First Nations, Metis, Inuit peoples?

The purpose of teaching students of treaty education and different content from perspectives regarding the first nations peoples is to show the significance of their people and what ramifications did this have. The First Nations are the largest portion of Canadian history, and without the treaties we history would have looked more like the American Indigenous history. By teaching the most important content establishes an understanding of the significance of the concept, and an overall understanding of what methods were taken to get where we are today; what ramifications are people experiencing?

  1. What does it mean for your understanding of the curriculum that “We are all treaty people”?

The meaning of “we are all treaty people” is a term that refers to how every Canadian regardless of status, geographical location, and race are affected by the treaties. The effects of the treaties signed allowed for the structure of the life we live and know today. The treaties are the reason we are able to build schools and cities that provide work for those within the city. The land gained in the treaties is a key component of the economy and plays a massive role in the building of Canadian society.

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February 15th

February 15

  1. List some of the ways that you see reinhabitation and decolonization happening throughout the narrative.

We are introduced to decolonization in the abstract, with the mention of First Nation children travelling together on their native land. Building this appreciation for the land is the first step in decolonizing, and reinhabiting their lands. On this expedition, children were taught to appreciate the land, and how their ancestors lived. One of the most important things on this trip is the renewal of First Nations interest in First Nations culture.  If these traditional values are not taught to the next generation, then they will be lost forever, and with it the fight for their rightful land. Children were shown the importance of land outside of the reserve, and that traditional lands were never confined to a government enforced border.

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February 8th

February 08

how do you think that school curricula are developed? (before reading)

  • I always thought that the curriculum was always determined by the government, with little outside influence. I also know that the curriculum varies between provinces, so the provincial government would likely make the curriculum. In terms of what a person is in charge, I have little understanding of the process.

 

  • After the reading, Some new perspectives that this article helped me realize, was that before the current curriculum, many assumptions were made about the students in the class. Firstly, those who have the least interaction with the curriculum have the most influence on how the curriculum is implemented. Teachers have very, very limited say on the curriculum. This is problematic because the government is neglecting the teachers of opinions, while they are one of the most affected by it. Only those who hold a high position are able to suggest added points to the curriculum.
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February 1st

February 1st

  •  The good student, a term we are highly familiar with in education. A term that describes a student that fits in one mould, determined by some teacher or Administration. This idea neglects the individuality of all of the students. Each student is vastly different, each coming differing outside knowledge. What does it mean to be a good student according to this common sense? Being quiet, listening to the instructor, putting your head down and doing your work? at least that is what I experienced. Within this commonsense mould, it is clear that there is an assumption that students learn best this way, or perhaps another motive for this to be implemented. It is strange that the common sense that is applied “good” students and “bad” alike have remained relatively unchanged or the past 50 years. Unlike 50 years ago we, have the technology to analyze student behaviour and advanced ways of learning. How can the whole world change, yet the commonsense standards engulfing the good student mould remains unchanged?

 

  • Can any student be a “good” student? Does every student have an equal opportunity to be put in this category? Are there some experiences (or lack of) that prevent them from fitting into this category? When I was a kid my parents made it clear that school is my job, I did not make any money, didn’t help with the bills, but just as my parents went to do their job so did I. They explained to me that I couldn’t do my job unless I’d eaten breakfast, and had a good sleep. Turn my field placement I found the students who are less fortunate, those who lack breakfast and a good night sleep or more restless and had shorter attention spans. If one does not have the prerequisites for a good thinking brain that day, then how can they learn. Applying this common sense children who are less financially fortunate, or one in any circumstances that would prevent them from fitting this mould would be “bad students”. But only looking and judging a kid by his performance at school the teacher is only looking at the tip of the iceberg. neglecting all the influences on the child’s life.

-When you are up to your arse in alligators, it is hard to remember your initial objective is to drain the swamp.

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Blog – January 25th

“Learning is doing” – John Dewey

 

  • What does it say about the teacher, about the student?
  • This would show that the teacher believes in giving the children the opportunity to experience things in order to learn. Personally, this was my favourite way for teachers to educate their students. In my school, this was practiced by the shop teachers. Part of the reason that I liked the shop classes so much was that you were able to experience a skill, and then learn from your experiences. For the students, this philosophy means allowing the children to do and experience the skills they will be tested on. Without doing the skill for themselves, they are doing no learning. For us kinesthetic learners, this is especially important.

 

  • How does it relate to your own understandings of curriculum and of school?
    • This quote goes hand in hand with an effective educational experience and outcome. As for how I understand education, this quote, for the most part, is implemented. In Dewey’s day, this was a very progressive thought. Today it seems that this is common knowledge, and thus implemented in schools for the most part.

 

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Digital Storytelling – Final Assignment

Here is the video Brenna and I made for our summary of learning!

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Our Learning Journey

Sarah and I would like to share our learning journey throughout ECS 210 through a poem in both digital and written format. Enjoy!

We can imagine our future students walking up to us one day

“Teacher, what’s the point of everything we learn?” They’ll say

We will reply, “It’s in the curriculum,

we as teachers have to obey the system.

Most of it was created by a lot of old white guys

teachers and students are just forced to comply.

There are different types such as formal, Null, and hidden.

Some of these curriculums aren’t even written.

To you, the curriculum seems like everything we teach,

but really there’s more than that in each.

We cater to the Christian, able-bodied, white male

any other culture/person we deem as stale.

That’s why the curriculum doesn’t benefit them.

For example, have you gone to the Ministry’s website to look for the Treaty Ed. section?

It’s at the bottom, it’s very hard to see.”

“Why teach that if it doesn’t look like it matters to me?”

“But it does because it’s part of Canada’s history.

That’s just what they want you to feel

like anything other than the European commonsense doesn’t appeal.

However, ignoring our problems won’t make them go away.

Without a doubt, Treaty Education is here to stay.

Furthermore, we are all treaty people,

but I guess it is hard to treat everyone equal.

We can’t explain First Nation’s culture as teachers.

What we can do is highlight the history features.

Reinhabitation is not needed for decolonization.

We need to unite as a nation.       

Oh! Did we mention not to cause any trouble?

If so, you could make your prison sentence double.

You need to show up, do your work, and pay attention.

It’s less about your comprehension.

In school, we turn you into a good citizen.

Show us that you have discipline.

If you do more, well, that’s great!

But all we want to do is give you a grade.

Schools try to do the bare minimum.

If you’re a personally responsible citizen, that’s good enough for them.

They’ll say: ‘There’s not enough time to dive into deeper issues, everyone.

There are more important things that need to get done.’”

“Hey teacher, what about our voice?”

“We can’t change the curriculum document, we don’t have a choice

Sorry, the assignments don’t change,

Since there’s no room to rearrange.

They are made for the ‘good student’

However, we as teachers need to be more prudent

John Dewey had an idea brewing

Unlike the traditional perspectives/theorists, he said ‘learning is doing’

We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does

It’s a natural process that happens just because”

“So, we don’t get to have our voices heard?”

“No, after the government, and teachers you come in third”

Through it seems we have moved past curriculum as product

It is still something that we still instruct

Within every classroom, there is a process

That students and teachers have to address

You can learn from everything we do

You just have to apply it too

Using concepts such as life-long learning, becoming engaging citizens and building a sense of self and community

However, there are other ways to learn these things, we guarantee

You can learn in or out of school

There is no golden rule

This is why it’s important for reflections to be done

We make connections to students, it’s not all just fun”

“What happens to the students who don’t fit the perfect model?”

“They’re on their own because we don’t have time to coddle.

For instance, Math is used all over the planet

It is seen as a ‘universal language’ but there is more to it.

We assume that everyone understands our thinking,

but our methods are not cross-linking.

Some cultures do not use base ten

Or solve math problems with a paper and pen.

If people use their fingers and toes,

they can count to numbers just like those.

The books we read impact the thoughts we think.

Consequently, it makes our worldviews shrink.

Students need to be exposed to more than a single story.

So that we don’t put different cultures in a category.

A lot of what is written in the curriculum is not necessarily correct,” we say,

“We need to use more than one teaching strategy each day.

That way we will not oppress.

Instead, we will ensure our students’ success.”

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ECS 210 Digital Story

Video link

Sarah Wright and Allicia Hood

We can imagine our future students walking up to us one day

“Teacher, what’s the point of everything we learn?” They’ll say

We will reply, “It’s in the curriculum, 

we as teachers have to obey the system. 

Most of it was created by a lot of old white guys

teachers and students are just forced to comply.

There are different types such as formal, Null, and hidden.

Some of these curriculums aren’t even written.

To you, the curriculum seems like everything we teach,

but really there’s more than that in each. 

We cater to the Christian, able-bodied, white male

any other culture/person we deem as stale.

That’s why the curriculum doesn’t benefit them.

For example, have you gone to the Ministry’s website to look for the Treaty Ed. section?

It’s at the bottom, it’s very hard to see.”

“Why teach that if it doesn’t look like it matters to me?”

“But it does because it’s part of Canada’s history.

That’s just what they want you to feel:

like anything other than the European commonsense doesn’t appeal.

However, ignoring our problems won’t make them go away.

Without a doubt, Treaty Education is here to stay.

Furthermore, we are all treaty people,

but I guess it is hard to treat everyone equal.

We can’t explain First Nation’s culture as teachers.

What we can do is highlight the history features.

Reinhabitation is not needed for decolonization.

We need to unite as a nation.       

Oh! Did we mention not to cause any trouble?

If so, you could make your prison sentence double.

You need to show up, do your work, and pay attention.

It’s less about your comprehension.

In school, we turn you into a good citizen.

Show us that you have discipline.

If you do more, well, that’s great!

But all we want to do is give you a grade.

Schools try to do the bare minimum.

If you’re a personally responsible citizen, that’s good enough for them.

They’ll say: ‘There’s not enough time to dive into deeper issues, everyone.

There are more important things that need to get done.’” 

“Hey teacher, what about our voice?”

“We can’t change the curriculum document, we don’t have a choice

Sorry, the assignments don’t change,

Since there’s no room to rearrange.

They are made for the ‘good student’

However, we as teachers need to be more prudent

John Dewey had an idea brewing

Unlike the traditional perspectives/theorists, he said ‘learning is doing’

We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does

It’s a natural process that happens just because”

“So, we don’t get to have our voices heard?”

“No, after the government, and teachers you come in third”

Through it seems we have moved past curriculum as product 

It is still something that we still instruct 

Within every classroom, there is a process 

That students and teachers have to address

You can learn from everything we do

You just have to apply it too

Using concepts such as life-long learning, becoming engaging citizens and building a sense of self and community

However, there are other ways to learn these things, we guarantee

You can learn in or out of school 

There is no golden rule

This is why it’s important for reflections to be done

We make connections to students, it’s not all just fun”

“What happens to the students who don’t fit the perfect model?”

“They’re on their own because we don’t have time to coddle.

For instance, Math is used all over the planet

It is seen as a ‘universal language’ but there is more to it.

We assume that everyone understands our thinking,

but our methods are not cross-linking.

Some cultures do not use base ten

Or solve math problems with a paper and pen.

If people use their fingers and toes,

they can count to numbers just like those. (Point to a number line). 

The books we read impact the thoughts we think.

Consequently, it makes our worldviews shrink.

Students need to be exposed to more than a single story.

So that we don’t put different cultures in a category.

A lot of what is written in the curriculum is not necessarily correct,” we say,

“We need to use more than one teaching strategy each day.

That way we will not oppress.

Instead, we will ensure our students’ success.”

Leave a comment