Author Archives: Taylor Bubnick

Assignment#4 – Summary of Learning

An audio-visual representation of what I have learned this semester.
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Blog Post #6 – Language, Numbers, Lenses, and Stories

Gale’s lecture, Poirier’s article, and Bear’s work all identify various ways in which Inuit mathematics challenge Eurocentric ideas about the purpose of mathematics and the way we learn it. Gale identifies many differences in a convenient chart during her presentation (Russell, 50:51). One of the major points she identifies is the emphasis the Traditional Western […] Continue reading

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Blog Post #5 – Citizenship and Education

During my K-12 schooling experience I can remember various teachings that had to do with citizenship education. I can remember learning things like picking up garbage, cleaning up after yourself, leaving a place nicer than we’d find it, taking the time to recycle items that could be repurposed, and placing trash in the appropriate bin. […] Continue reading

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Post #4 – Treaty Education

During fall semester several years ago, Dr. Mike Cappello received an email from an intern asking for help. Here’s part of it: “As part of my classes for my three week block I have picked up a Social Studies 30 course. This past week we have been discussing the concept of standard of living and […] Continue reading

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Post #3 – Curriculum & Politics

Levin (2008) explains how curriculum finds its roots in policy and politics. Levin points out that, “[c]urriculum politics should be understood as part of the overall process of government and especially the influence of politics” (p. 9). In the political hierarchy, voters carry power and they provide an undeniable pressure on those who hold the […] Continue reading

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Post #2 – The “Good Student”

In Kumashiros’s, “Preparing Teachers for Crisis: A Sample Lesson” a good student according to commonsense is one who follows direction and does not ask questions rather, they just do what they are instructed. It is a student who is complacent with the flow of the classroom and is able to sit still and focus on […] Continue reading

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Blog Post #1 – Curriculum

This week, commonsense was a major focal point in our discussions and readings. Kumashiro provides a detailed description about what it was like teaching in Nepal. Kumashiro defines commonsense as things everyone should know, things that are often unquestioned because they are so routine and common, things that are taken for granted, and what is […] Continue reading

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