Author Archives: brittneyleitner

Gaining Pedagogical Insight of How to Teach Mathematics for Meaningful Learning

            As I did my curriculum critique assignment on the grade 6 mathematics curriculum, the article “Jagged Worldviews Colliding” by Leroy Little Bear (2000) was really interesting to me because I was thinking about this topic extensively. I chose grade six mathematics as a focus to challenge myself to step out of my Arts Education… Continue reading Gaining Pedagogical Insight of How to Teach Mathematics for Meaningful Learning Continue reading

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The Biases of Brittney: Reflecting on My Upbringing and Schooling and The Danger of the Single Story

            I grew up in an upper-middle class neighbourhood where most kids in my school came from two parent, heteronormative, white families, usually with one boy, one girl and a dog or cat. I lived down the street from my elementary school and I had access to extra-curricular activities in my neighbourhood which my family… Continue reading The Biases of Brittney: Reflecting on My Upbringing and Schooling and The Danger of the Single Story Continue reading

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The Highly Political Enterprise Of School Curricula: Considering the Development and Implantation of Treaty Ed

            Ben Levin (2007) in the article “Curriculum Policy and the Politics of What Should Be Learned in Schools” expounds his thoughts of the political nature of development and implementation of school curricula. In this article, he defines curriculum as “an official statement of what students are expected to know and be able to do”… Continue reading The Highly Political Enterprise Of School Curricula: Considering the Development and Implantation of Treaty Ed Continue reading

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“We Are All Treaty People”: Facilitating Meaningful Connections to Treaty Education

            I believe teaching Treaty Ed and First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) content and perspectives where there are few or no First Nations, Metis, Inuit peoples is very important for visibility and education of Indigenous perspectives. If students are immersed in a diverse student population, a part of their secondary socialization process would be… Continue reading “We Are All Treaty People”: Facilitating Meaningful Connections to Treaty Education Continue reading

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Place Education and Its Valuable Connection to Traditional Mushkegowuk Ways of Knowing

            The article “Learning from Place: A Return to Traditional Mushkegowuk Ways of Knowing” by Jean-Paul Restoule, Sheila Gruner and Edmund Metatawabin shares valuable insight into Mushkegowuk perspectives of the environment and its importance in the education of the next generation. This project focused on how the “James Bay Cree perceive the land/environment and how… Continue reading Place Education and Its Valuable Connection to Traditional Mushkegowuk Ways of Knowing Continue reading

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Seeing All Students as ‘Good Students’

            Kumashiro (n.d.) in the chapter “Preparing Teachers for Crisis: What It Means to Be a Student” denotes how commonsensical ideas in school culture and ‘hidden curriculum’ socially construct the concept of what it means to be a “good” student or what model behaviour looks like. The reading begins with Kumashiro reflecting on an experience… Continue reading Seeing All Students as ‘Good Students’ Continue reading

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Exploring Aesthetic Experience and How It Relates to My Personal Pedagogy

            The topic and scholar I have chosen to explore further is Maxine Greene and aesthetic experience. This particular topic first piqued my interest because I had heard about aesthetic experience briefly in one of my introductory Arts Education classes and I wanted to learn more. I began exploring this topic by first learning more… Continue reading Exploring Aesthetic Experience and How It Relates to My Personal Pedagogy Continue reading

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Four Models Of Curriculum Theory

            According to Mark Smith in the article “Curriculum Theory and Practice” (2000), there are four models of curriculum, each with unique benefits and challenges. The first model discussed in the article is “curriculum as a body of knowledge to be transmitted” (Smith, 2000, p. 2). This approach considers curriculum in terms of syllabi and […] Continue reading

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Examining the Concept of ‘Common sense’

         In the article, “Against Common Sense: Teaching and Learning Toward Social Justice,” Kevin Kumashiro defines ‘common sense’ as a social construct created to “give us a sense of comfort” (Kumashiro, XXXV) as we understand the social contract for conformation to “tradition, professionalism, morality, and normalcy” (Kumashiro, XXXV). Kumashiro proposes that common sense can perpetuate […] Continue reading

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